PRR Steam Locomotive Classification
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PRR STEAM  LOCOMOTIVE  CLASSIFICATION

Bob Berkey, April 2000


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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N Q S T CC HC HH



Class Wheel
Arr.
Comments
A1 0-4-0T Formerly Class Q. Eight engines built new at PRR shops (Altoona and Wilmington) 1886-1892. 44" drivers. No tender.
A2 0-4-0 Formerly Class Q. 31 engines built new at PRR shops (Altoona and Wilmington) 1885-1892. 50" drivers. Eight later converted to Class A2a.
A2a 0-4-0T Formerly Class Q. Seven engines built new at Wilmington Shops 1887-1891. Eight engines later converted from Class A2. Same as Class A2 but without tender.
A3 0-4-0 Formerly Class U. 81 engines built new at Altoona in 1895-1905. 50" drivers. Belpaire firebox. 16 later converted to Class A3a.
A3a 0-4-0T Formerly Class U. Four engines built new at Altoona 1900-1902. 16 engines later converted from Class A3. Same as Class A3 but without tender and with saddle tank.
A4 0-4-0 64 engines built new at Altoona 1906-1913. 50" drivers. Belpaire firebox.
A5s 0-4-0 47 engines built new at Altoona 1916-1924. 50" drivers. Belpaire firebox. Piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear, superheated.
A21 0-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VA1. Four engines built new by Pittsburgh Locomotive Works 1880-1883. 50" drivers.
A22 0-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VA2. 19 engines built new at Terre Haute shops 1883-1893. 51" drivers. One later converted to Class A22a.
A22a 0-4-0T ex-Vandalia Class VA2a. One engine converted from Class A22. Same as Class A22 but without tender and with saddle tank.
A23 0-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VA3. Two engines built new by Pittsburgh Locomotive Works 1893. 50" drivers.
A29 0-4-0T One engine built new at Fort Wayne shops in 1879, #7109, ex-PFtW&C #109. 48" drivers. No tender.
A30 0-4-0T One engine built new at Columbus shops in 1897. 50" drivers. No tender.

Notes on Class A

  • There were no engines assigned to classes A6 through A20, A24 through A28, or higher than A30.


B1 0-6-0T Formerly Class F. 24 engines built new at Altoona 1869-1873. 44" drivers. No tender.
B2 0-6-0 Formerly Class H. 53 engines built new at various PRR shops 1872-1883. 44" drivers.
B3 0-6-0 Formerly Class M. 211 engines built new at various PRR shops 1882-1892. 50" drivers. Altoona boiler. Three later converted to Class B3a.
B3a 0-6-0T Formerly Class M. Three engines, all converted from Class B3. Same as Class B3 but without tender and with saddle tank.
B4 0-6-0 Formerly Class M. 36 engines built new at Altoona 1892. 50" drivers. Belpaire firebox. Three later converted to Class B4b.
B4a 0-6-0 Formerly Class M. 97 engines built new at Altoona 1893-1904. 50" drivers. Belpaire firebox. Same as Class B4 but with larger grate area. One engine later converted to Class B4b.
B4b 0-6-0T Formerly Class M. Four engines, all converted from Class B4 and B4a. Saddle tanks applied and tenders removed.
B5 0-6-0 57 engines, all converted from Class H1 2-8-0 by removing the last driving axle and the pilot truck.
B5a 0-6-0 32 engines, all converted from classes H2 and H2a by removing the last driving axle and the pilot truck.
B6 0-6-0 79 engines built new 1902-1913. 56" drivers. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Stephenson valve gear. Most were later superheated and reclassified as Class B6s.
B6s 0-6-0 Class B6 engines rebuilt with superheaters. Number of engines unknown.
B6sa 0-6-0 55 engines built new at Altoona 1913-1914. 56" drivers. Radial-stay firebox, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear.
B6sb 0-6-0 238 engines built new at Altoona 1916-1926. 56" drivers. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear.
B7 0-6-0 Six engines, all converted from Class H3 2-8-0 by removing the last driving axle and the pilot truck.
B7a 0-6-0 32 engines, all converted from Class H3a 2-8-0 by removing the last driving axle and the pilot truck.
B7b 0-6-0 Seven engines, all converted from Class H3b 2-8-0 by removing the last driving axle and the pilot truck.
B8 0-6-0 267 engines built new 1903-1913. 56" drivers. Belpaire firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear. 27 engines later converted to Class B8a.
B8a 0-6-0T 27 engines, all converted from Class B8. Same as Class B8 but without tender and with saddle tank.
B21 0-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VB1. Four engines built new by Pittsburgh Locomotive Works 1893. 51" drivers. #8795 and 8796.
B22 0-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VB2. 13 engines built new 1892-1902. 51" drivers. #8783-8793.
B23 0-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VB3. 13 engines built new by Schenectady 1903-1907. 51" drivers. #8770-8782.
B28s 0-6-0 USRA design. 30 engines built new by Alco 1918-1919. 51" drivers. Radial-stay firebox, piston valves, Baker valve gear.
B29 0-6-0 136 engines built new by Alco and Lima 1903-1913. 51" drivers. Radial-stay firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear. All retired by 1931.
B30 0-6-0 ex-TWV&O. Two engines built new by Rome Locomotive Works 1890.
B31 0-6-0 ex-TC&OR. Two engines built new by Rogers 1891-1892. 50" drivers.
B32 0-6-0 ex-TC&OR. One engine built new by Baldwin 1892. 50" drivers.
B33 0-6-0 ex-CL&N. One engine built new by Pittsburgh 1901. 50" drivers.
B35 0-6-0 11 engines built in various Lines West shops 1885-1888. 50" drivers.
B61 0-6-0 ex-CA&C. Two engines. 48" drivers.

Notes on Class B

  • There were no engines assigned to classes B9 through B20, B24 through B27, B34, B36 through B60, or B62 and higher.


C1 0-8-0 90 engines built new at Altoona 1925-1927. 56" drivers. #6550-6599 built in 1925, #6600-6639 built in 1927.
C29 0-8-0 10 engines, all converted from classes H1, H2 and H2a 2-8-0 by removing the pilot truck.
C30 0-8-0T One engine built new at Columbus shops 1895. 50" drivers. #8434.
C31 0-8-0T One engine, converted from Class H31 2-8-0. 46" drivers. #8542.

Notes on Class C

  • There were no engines assigned to classes C2 through C28 or C32 and higher.


D1 4-4-0 Formerly Class A. 13 engines built new at Altoona 1868-1872. 68" drivers.
D2 4-4-0 Formerly Class B. 20 engines built new at Altoona 1869-1880. Nine engines converted from Class D2a. 62" drivers.
D2a 4-4-0 Formerly Class B. 45 engines built new at Altoona 1881-1882. 68" drivers. Nine engines later converted to Class D2, with 62" drivers.
D3 4-4-0 Formerly Class C. 67 engines built new at various PRR shops 1869-1881. 62" drivers.
D4 4-4-0 Formerly Class C (anthracite). 37 engines built new at Altoona 1873-1880. 62" drivers. Similar to Class D3 but with larger grate area. 15 engines later converted to Class D4a.
D4a 4-4-0 Formerly Class C (anthracite). 15 engines, all converted from Class D4. 68" drivers.
D5 4-4-0 Formerly Class G. 18 engines built new at Altoona 1870-1873. 56" drivers.
D6 4-4-0 Formerly Class K. 19 engines built new at Altoona 1881-1883. 78" drivers. Seven engines later converted to Class D6a. One engine later converted to Class D6b. Four engines later converted to Class D7. Three engines later converted to Class D7a.
D6a 4-4-0 Formerly Class K. Seven engines, all converted from Class D6. 72" drivers.
D6b 4-4-0 Formerly Class K. One engine, converted from Class D6. 68" drivers.
D7 4-4-0 Formerly Class A (anthracite). 58 engines built new at Altoona 1882-1891. 68" drivers. Similar to Class D1 but with larger grate area.
D7a 4-4-0 Formerly Class A (anthracite). 61 engines built new at Altoona 1883-1891. 62" drivers. Similar to Class D1 but with larger grate area.
D8 4-4-0 Formerly Class N. 45 engines built new at various PRR shops 1883-1888. 62" drivers. Six engines later converted to Class D8a.
D8a 4-4-0 Formerly Class O. 86 engines built new at various PRR shops 1883-1889. Six engines converted from Class D8. 62" drivers. Two engines later converted to Class D8.
D9 4-4-0 Formerly Class O. Four engines built new at various PRR shops 1889. One engine converted from Class D9a. 62" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 54" boiler.
D9a 4-4-0 Formerly Class O. 13 engines built new at Altoona 1889. 68" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 54" boiler. One engine later converted to Class D9.
D10 4-4-0 Formerly Class O. 51 engines built new at Altoona 1890-1892. One engine converted from Class D10. 62" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 57" boiler.
D10a 4-4-0 Formerly Class O. 58 engines built new at Altoona 1890-1892. 68" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 57" boiler. One engine later rebuilt as Class D10.
D11 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. 21 engines built new at Altoona 1885-1887. 62" drivers. Belpaire firebox. Two later rebuilt as Class D11a.
D11a 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. 65 engines built new at Altoona 1883-1888. Two engines converted from Class D11. 68" drivers. Radial-stay firebox.
D12 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. Two engines built new at Altoona 1890. 62" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 54" boiler. Both later rebuilt as Class D13c.
D12a 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. 41 engines built new at Altoona 1889-1891. 68" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 54" boiler. All later rebuilt as Class D13a and D13c.
D13 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. Two engines built new at Altoona 1892. 62" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 57" boiler. Both later rebuilt as Class D13a.
D13a 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. 77 engines built new at Altoona 1892-1893. An unknown number converted from Class D12a and D13. 68" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 57" boiler. 22 engines later rebuilt as Class D13c.
D13b 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. Number of engines built is unknown. 62" drivers.
D13c 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. 73 engines built new at Altoona 1893-1902. An unknown number of engines converted from classes D12, D12a and D13a. 68" drivers. Belpaire firebox, 57" boiler. 4 engines later rebuilt as Class D13a.
D14 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. Six engines built new at Altoona 1893. 78" drivers. Belpaire firebox. Three engines later rebuilt as Class D14c.
D14a 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. 16 engines built new at Altoona 1894. 80" drivers. Belpaire firebox. All later rebuilt as Class D14b.
D14b 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. 16 engines, all converted from Class D14a. 68" drivers.
D14c 4-4-0 Formerly Class P. Three engines, all converted from Class D14. 68" drivers.
D15 4-4-0 Formerly Class T. One engine built new at Altoona 1892. #1515, Lindner cross compound. 84" drivers. Belpaire firebox.
D16 4-4-0 Formerly Class L. Six engines built new at Altoona 1896. 76 engines converted from classes D16a and D16c. 68" drivers, slide valves
D16a 4-4-0 Formerly Class L. 73 engines built new at Altoona 1895-1898. 80" drivers, slide valves. 71 engines later converted to Class D16.
D16b 4-4-0 Formerly Class L. 262 engines built new at Altoona 1900-1908. Nine engines converted from Class D16d. 68" drivers, slide valves. 205 engines later converted to Class D16sb.
D16sb 4-4-0 Formerly Class L. 241 engines, all converted from Class D16b, D16cs and D16d. Superheated. 68" drivers, piston valves.
D16c 4-4-0 Formerly Class L. 12 engines built new at Altoona 1899. 80" drivers. Seven engines rebuilt as Class D16sb, five engines rebuilt as Class D16.
D16d 4-4-0 Formerly Class L. 45 engines built new at Altoona 1900-1910. 80" drivers. 29 engines rebuilt as Class D16sb, nine rebuilt as Class D16b.
D21 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD1. Four engines built new by Baldwin 1871-1873. 62" drivers.
D22 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD2. Six engines built new by Pittsburgh 1883-1886. 67" drivers.
D22a 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD2a. Two engines built new by Pittsburgh 1888-1889. 67" drivers
D23 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD3. Four engines built new by Pittsburgh 1884. 62" drivers
D24 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD4. Five engines built new by Rogers 1887. 62" drivers
D25 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD5. Four engines built new by Pittsburgh 1890. 67" drivers
D25a 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD5a. One engine built new by Pittsburgh 1890. 67" drivers
D26 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD6. Four engines built new by Schenectady 1895. 73" drivers
D26a 4-4-0 ex-Vandalia Class VD6a. Four engines built new by Schenectady 1899. 78" drivers
D30 4-4-0 ex-TWV&O. Two engines built new by Rome 1890.
D31 4-4-0 ex-TWV&O. Four engines built new by Baldwin 1892-1895. 62" drivers.
D32 4-4-0 ex-TWV&O. One engine built new by Baldwin 1892. Vauclain compound. 62" drivers.
D34 4-4-0 ex-Cleveland & Marietta. Three engines built new by Rome 1885. 63" drivers.
D35 4-4-0 ex-Cleveland & Marietta. One engine built new by Rome 1885. 56" drivers.
D36 4-4-0 ex-Cleveland & Marietta. Two engines built new by Rogers 1885-1886. 57" drivers.
D37 4-4-0 ex-CL&N. Three engines built new by Baldwin 1894. 60" drivers.
D38 4-4-0 ex-CL&N. One engine built new by Pittsburgh 1899. 63" drivers.
D39 4-4-0 ex-GR&IClass GD9. Seven engines built new by Baldwin 1892. 62" drivers.
D39a 4-4-0 ex-GR&IClass GD9a. Four engines built new by Baldwin 1893. 68" drivers.
D61 4-4-0 ex-CA&C. Five engines built new by Baldwin 1892. Two built as Vauclain compounds and three as two-cylinder simple engines. 68" drivers.
D Odd 4-4-0 experimental 2-cylinder simple, Schenectady 1892, #1504, retired in 1911.
D Odd 4-4-0 experimental Vauclain compound, Baldwin 1892, #1510, later converted to a 2-cylinder simple, retired in 1911.

Notes on Class D

  • Old Class L was first assigned to a single engine built in 1881. This engine was disposed of before 1895 and the letter L was reassigned to what became the new D16 class.
  • There were no engines assigned to classes D17 through D20, D27 through D29, D33, D40 through D60, or D62 and higher.
  • There were six 3'-gauge 4-4-0 engines acquired with the Ohio River & Western and another engine acquired with the Waynesburg & Washington, but none of these received class designations.


E1 4-4-2 Three engines built new at Altoona 1899. Camelback, Wooten firebox, later sold to the Long Island.
E1a 4-4-2 One engine built new at Altoona 1900. Radial-stay firebox
E2 4-4-2 82 engines built new at Altoona 1901-1902. Radial-stay firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear. Two engines later converted to Class E2a. 14 engines later converted to Class E7sa.
E2a 4-4-2 93 engines built new at Altoona 1902-1905. Belpaire firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear. Two engines later converted to Class E3sa, 10 engines later converted to Class E3sd, and 13 engines later converted to Class E7s.
E2b 4-4-2 70 engines built new at Altoona and Schenectady 1903-1904. Four engines converted from classes E28 and E29. Belpaire firebox, inboard piston valves, Stephenson valve gear. 57 engines later converted to Class E7s.
E2c 4-4-2 22 engines built new at Schenectady 1903. Belpaire firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear. 20 engines later converted to Class E7s.
E2d 4-4-2 32 engines built new at Altoona 1906-1908. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear. Nine engines later converted to Class E2sd and 20 engines later converted to Class E3sd.
E2sd 4-4-2 Nine engines, all converted from Class E2d by the addition of superheaters.
E3 4-4-2 Eight engines built new at Altoona 1901-1902. Radial-stay firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear.
E3a 4-4-2 114 engines built new at Altoona 1902-1905. Belpaire firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear. 11 engines later converted to Class E3sa and four engines later converted to Class E3sd.
E3sa 4-4-2 13 engines, all converted from classes E2a and E3a.
E3d 4-4-2 56 engines built new at Altoona 1906-1910. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear. All later superheated and reclassified as Class E3sd.
E3sd 4-4-2 90 engines, all converted from classes E2a, E2d, E3a and E3d. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear, superheater.
E5 4-4-2 11 engines built new at Altoona 1910-1911. Similar to Class E3d but with Kiesel trailing truck. All later superheated and reclassified as Class E5s.
E5s 4-4-2 One engine built new at Altoona 1913. 11 engines converted from Class E5.
E6 4-4-2 One engine built new at Altoona 1910. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear, Kiesel trailing truck. Later superheated and reclassified as Class E6s.
E6s 4-4-2 81 engines built new at Altoona 1912-1914. One engine converted from Class E6 and one engine converted from Class E6sa.
E6sa 4-4-2 One engine built new at Altoona 1912. Same as Class E6s but with Young rotary valve gear. Later converted to standard piston valves and reclassified as Class E6s.
E7s 4-4-2 90 engines, all converted from classes E2a, E2b and E2c. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Stephenson valve gear.
E7sa 4-4-2 14 engines, all converted from Class E2. Radial-stay firebox, piston valves, Stephenson valve gear.
E21 4-4-2 ex-Vandalia Class VE1. Four engines built new by Schenectady 1902. 20-1/2" x 26" cylinders, 79" drivers.
E22 4-4-2 ex-Vandalia Class VE2. Five engines built new by Schenectady 1903. 21" x 26" cylinders, 79" drivers.
E23 4-4-2 ex-Vandalia Class VE3. 10 engines built new by Alco 1906-1910. 21-1/2" x 26" cylinders, 79" drivers. Radial-stay firebox, inboard piston valves, Stephenson valve gear. All later superheated and reclassified as Class E23s.
E23s 4-4-2 ex-Vandalia Class VE3s. 10 engines, all converted from Class E23.
E28 4-4-2 Two engines, #2759 and #7451, built new by Baldwin 1905. Experimental 4-cylinder balanced compound. Both later rebuilt and reclassified as Class E2b.
E29 4-4-2 Two engines, #2760 and #7452, built new by Alco 1905. Experimental Cole 4-cylinder compound. Both later rebuilt and reclassified as Class E2b.
E Odd 4-4-2 experimental De Glehn 4-cylinder compound, France 1904, #2512. Retired in 1912.
E Odd 4-4-2 ex-NYP&N, light engines, specifications unknown

Notes on Class E

  • There were no engines assigned to classes E4, E8 through E20, E24 through E27, or E30 and higher.
  • All engines in classes E1 and E2 were equipped with 20-1/2" x 26" cylinders and 80" drivers.
  • All engines in classes E3 and E5 were equipped with 22" x 26" cylinders and 80" drivers.
  • lass E6s was equipped with 23-1/2" x 26" cylinders and 80" drivers.
  • All engines inClass E7 were equipped with 22-1/2" x 26" cylinders and 80" drivers.
  • Classes E2 and E3 were not Lines West designs, but were designed by and for Lines East.


F1 2-6-0 43 engines built new at Altoona 1895-1897. Four engines converted from Class F2. Belpaire firebox
F1a 2-6-0 83 engines built new at Altoona 1898-1901. Belpaire firebox
F2 2-6-0 Four engines built new at Altoona 1895-1896. Belpaire firebox. Experimental cross-compounds, all later converted to Class F1.
F3 2-6-0 24 engines built new by Baldwin 1901. Belpaire firebox.
F3b 2-6-0 54 engines built new by Baldwin 1901. Radial-stay firebox.
F3c 2-6-0 103 engines built new by Altoona and Baldwin 1902-1906. Belpaire firebox. Three engines later superheated and reclassified as Class F3sc.
F3sc 2-6-0 Three engines, all converted from Class F3c.
F21 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF1. Six engines built new by Baldwin 1873-1879. 55" drivers.
F22 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF2. Four engines built new by Hinkley 1879-1880. 57" drivers.
F23 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF3. Three engines built new by Baldwin 1882. 55-1/2" drivers.
F24 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF4. 26 engines built new by Pittsburgh 1896-1900. 63" drivers. Radial-stay firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear.
F24a 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF4a. 10 engines built new by Pittsburgh 1902-1903. 63" drivers.
F25 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF5. 18 engines built new by Schenectady 1903-1904. 63" drivers. Radial-stay firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear.
F26 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF6. 15 engines built new by Schenectady 1904. 51" drivers.
F27s 2-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VF7s. 14 engines built new by Alco 1906-1907. 63" drivers. Piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear.
F30 2-6-0 ex-CS&H. Two engines built new by Dickson 1883. 56" drivers.
F31 2-6-0 ex-C&M. Two engines built new by Rogers 1890. 55" drivers.
F61 2-6-0 ex-CA&C. One engine built new by Baldwin 1887. 48" drivers.

Notes on Class F

  • There were no engines assigned to classes F4 through F20, F28 through F29, F32 through F60, or F62 and higher.
  • All engines in classes F1 and F3 were equipped with 20" x 28" cylinders and 62" drivers.
  • There were seven 3'-gauge 2-6-0 engines acquired with the Ohio River & Western and another nine acquired with the Waynesburg & Washington, but none of these received class designations.


G1 4-6-0 Formerly Class D. 286 engines built new at various shops 1868-1875. 56" drivers. 157 later converted to Class G1a and G2.
G1a 4-6-0 Formerly Class D. An unknown number of engines converted from classes G1 and G2. 50" drivers.
G2 4-6-0 Formerly Class E. 195 engines built new at various shops 1869-1884. 50" drivers. Six engines converted to Class G1a.
G3 4-6-0 Formerly Class X. 21 engines built new at Fort Wayne shops 1892-1893. Two engines converted from Class G3a. Belpaire firebox, 68" drivers.
G3a 4-6-0 Formerly Class X. Two engines built new at Fort Wayne shops 1893. Belpaire firebox, 62" drivers. Both later converted to Class G3.
G4 4-6-0 38 engines built new at Altoona 1899-1901. Radial-stay firebox, slide valves, Stephenson valve gear, 72" drivers. Eight engines later converted to Class G4s.
G4s 4-6-0 Eight engines, all converted from Class G4. Larger cylinders, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear, superheaters.
G4a 4-6-0 75 engines built new at Altoona 1899-1901. Same as Class G4 but with 62" drivers. One engine later converted to Class G4b.
G4b 4-6-0 One engine, #7306, converted from Class G4a. Same as Class G4a but with Belpaire firebox and larger grate area.
G5s 4-6-0 90 engines built new at Altoona 1923-1925. Belpaire firebox, piston valves, Walschaerts valve gear, 68" drivers. Forty had scattered numbers and the other 50 were #5700-5749. Another 31 engines were built for the Long Island Railroad from 1924-1929, their #20-50.
G21 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG1. Four engines built new by Pittsburgh 1886. 50" drivers.
G22 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG2. Four engines built new by Pittsburgh 1889. 50" drivers.
G23 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG3. Three engines built new by Schenectady 1891. 57" drivers.
G24 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG4. Seven engines built new by Pittsburgh 1892-1893. 51" drivers.
G25 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG5. One engine built new by Pittsburgh 1892. 72" drivers.
G25a 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG5a. Two engines built new by Pittsburgh 1892. 72" drivers.
G25b 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG5b. One engine built new by Pittsburgh 1893. 72" drivers.
G26a 4-6-0 ex-Vandalia Class VG6a. Two engines built new by Pittsburgh 1895. 56" drivers.
G30 4-6-0 ex-TWV&O. Five engines built new by Rogers 1891-1892. 56" drivers.
G31 4-6-0 ex-TWV&O. Eight engines built new by Baldwin 1892. 56" drivers.
G32 4-6-0 ex-C&M. Two engines built new by Rogers 1892. 55" drivers.
G33 4-6-0 ex-C&M. One engine built new by Rogers 1893. 54" drivers.
G34 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG4. Six engines built new by Baldwin 1899-1900. 62" drivers.
G34s 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG4s. One engine built new by Baldwin 1900. 62" drivers.
G35 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG5. One engine built new by Pittsburgh 1901. 62" drivers.
G35s 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG5s. Three engines built new by Pittsburgh 1901. 62" drivers.
G35a 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG5a. Four engines built new by Pittsburgh 1902. 62" drivers.
G35sa 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG5sa. Three engines built new by Pittsburgh 1902. 62" drivers.
G36s 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG6s. Two engines built new by Alco 1907 and 1909. 68" drivers.
G37s 4-6-0 ex-GR&IClass GG7s. Six engines built new by Alco 1907 and 1909. 68" drivers.
G61 4-6-0 ex-CA&C. Seven engines built new by Rogers 1889-1891. 54" drivers.
G61a 4-6-0 ex-CA&C. One engine built new by Rogers 1890. 54" drivers.
G Odd 4-6-0 experimental 2-cylinder cross compound, Schenectady 1892, #1503, retired in 1902.
G Odd 4-6-0 experimental Vauclain compounf, Baldwin 1892, # 1502, sold in 1900.

Notes on Class G

  • There were no engines assigned to classes G6 through G20, G27 through G29, G38 through G60, or G62 and higher.
  • There were three 3'-gauge 4-6-0 engines acquired with the Ohio River & Western, but none of these received Class designations.
  • I can find no record of a Class G34b.


H1 2-8-0 A total of 545 of these engines were built between 1875 and 1886. These were originallyClass I, under the old PRR classification system, and can be distinguished by their 'Altoona' fireboxes. 57 of them were later converted to Class B5 0-6-0, by removing the pilot truck and the last driving axle. One engine was converted to Class C29 0-8-0, by removing the pilot truck.
H2 2-8-0 A total of 210 of these engines were built. 105 wereClass H2 (built 1888-1890) and 105 wereClass H2a (1886-1889). They were all originallyClass S and featured 'crown bar' fireboxes. Five H2 and 27 H2a engines were later converted to 0-6-0Class B5a. Three H2 and six H2a were later converted to 0-8-0Class C29.
H3 2-8-0 A total of 890 of these engines were built. 418 wereClass H3 (1885-1892, 140 psi operating pressure), 329 wereClass H3a (1890-1893, 150 psi) and 143 wereClass H3b (1891-1897, 150 psi, slightly larger grate area). They were all originallyClass R and featured Belpaire fireboxes. 53 H3 were converted to Class H3a by increasing the boiler pressure. 28 H3a and 12 H3b engines were converted to Class H3c by increasing the stroke from 24" to 28". Eight H3a engines were converted to Class H3e, which involved lowering the firebox crown sheet. Six H3 were later converted to 0-6-0Class B7. 32 H3a were later converted to 0-6-0Class B7a. Seven H3b were later converted to 0-6-0Class B7b. As built, all of the engines in classes H1, H2 and H3 had 50" drivers and 20" x 24" cylinders. I have additional specification info, if you'd like to have it.
H4 2-8-0 105 of these engines were built 1897-1901, for service on Lines West (of Pittsburgh).
H5 2-8-0 15 of these engines were built at Altoona in 1898, as pushers for the Gallitzin grade.
H6 2-8-0 189 of these engines were built 1899-1901. One engine was later superheated and reclassified as H6s. This also would have involved replacement of the slide valves with piston valves. As built, the engines in classes H4, H5 and H6 were very similar. All had narrow Belpaire fireboxes with 33.3 sq ft of grate, 56" drivers, slide valves and Stephenson valve gear. Classes H4 and H6 operated at 205 psi and had 22" x 28" cylinders. Class H5 operated at 185 psi and had 23-1/2" x 28" cylinders.
H6a 2-8-0 1242 of these engines were built 1901-1905. These were otherwise identical to Class H6 but had wide Belpaire fireboxes with 49 sq ft of grate area. 156 engines were later superheated, fitted with piston valves and reclassified as H6sa. Six engines were converted to Class H6b by fitting them with piston valves and Walschaerts valve gear.
H6b 2-8-0 603 of these engines were built 1905-1913. These were otherwise identical to Class H6a but had piston valves and Walschaerts valve gear. 543 engines were later superheated and reclassified as H6sb. It is virtually impossible to distinguish between classes H6b and H6sb unless you can read the builder's plate or you're looking at an older photo of a superheated engine and can see the superheater damper mechanism.
H8 2-8-0 25 of these engines were built at Altoona in 1907. They featured 24" x 28" cylinders. 20 engines were later superheated and reclassified as H8s. Four engines were converted to Class H9s by installing superheaters and 25" x 28" cylinders.
H8s 2-8-0 13 of the 20 engines in thisClass were later converted to Class H9s by installing 25" x 28" cylinders.
H8a 2-8-0 117 of these were built 1907-1911. 35 were later superheated and reclassified as H8sa. Nine were converted to Class H9s, with superheaters and 25" x 28" cylinders. 65 were converted to Class H10s, with superheaters and 26" x 28" cylinders.
H8b 2-8-0 352 of these were built 1908-1913. 228 were superheated and reclassified as H8sb. Five were converted to 25" x 28" cylinders and reclassified as H9. 106 were converted to Class H9s, with superheaters and 25" x 28" cylinders.
H8sb 2-8-0 143 of the 228 engines in thisClass were later converted to Class H9s by installing 25" x 28" cylinders.
H8c 2-8-0 160 of these were built 1910-1913. 56 were superheated and reclassified as H8sc. 11 were converted to Class H9sc by installing superheaters and 25" x 28" cylinders. 82 were converted to Class H10s by installing superheaters and 26" x 28" cylinders.
H8sc 2-8-0 32 of these were built at Altoona in 1912. Eight were converted to Class H9sa by installing 25" x 28" cylinders. 15 were converted to Class H10s by installing 26" x 28" cylinders.
H9 2-8-0 All five of these engines were later superheated and reclassified as H9s.
H9s 2-8-0 274 of these engines were built 1913-1914.
H9sa 2-8-0 One of these engines was converted to and reclassified as H9sc, involving unknown changes. Three of these engines were converted to Class H10s by installing 26" x 28" cylinders.
H9sc 2-8-0 Three of these engines were later converted to Class H10s by installing 26" x 28" cylinders.
H10s 2-8-0 273 of these engines were built 1913-1916. The engines in classes H8, H9 and H10 are almost identical. All had 62" drivers, Walschaerts valve gear, piston valves, and a Belpaire firebox with 55.2 sq ft of grate area. The significant differences are the cylinder bores (24" for H8, 25" for H9 and 26" for H10) and the presence or absence of a superheater. It is virtually impossible to distinguish between them unless you can read the builder's plate.
H28 2-8-0 Two locomotives, #2762 and #7748, were built by Alco in 1905. These had 63" drivers, radial-stay fireboxes, inboard piston valves and Stephenson valve gear. They were experimental engines, similar to theClass J28 and E29, and led to the development of large-boilered classes H8/9/10.
H30 2-8-0 One engine, built 1893 and acquired with the Cleveland & Marietta
H31 2-8-0 Two engines, built 1892, previous owner unknown
H32 2-8-0 ex-Grand Rapids & IndianaClass GH2, 10 engines built at Altoona 1896-1898
H33 2-8-0 ex-Grand Rapids & IndianaClass GH3, 12 engines built by Baldwin 1892-1893
H34s 2-8-0 ex-Grand Rapids & IndianaClass GH4s, 14 engines built by Pittsburgh 1905-1908
H34sa 2-8-0 ex-Grand Rapids & IndianaClass GH4sa, 4 engines built by Pittsburgh 1910
H61 2-8-0 ex-Cleveland, Akron & Columbus, one engine built by Baldwin 1888
H61a 2-8-0 ex-Cleveland, Akron & Columbus, one engine built by Baldwin 1888

Notes on Class H



I1s 2-10-0 598 of these engines were built. #790 was the first, built by Altoona in 1916. 122 more engines, with typical scattered engine numbers, were built by Altoona between 1918 and 1919. 475 more engines, #4225-4699, were built by Baldwin in 1922-1923. None of the first 123 engines were built with feedwater heaters. All of the Baldwin-built engines were equipped with Worthington BL2 heaters
I1sa 2-10-0 Most of theClass I1s engines (489 as of July 1947) were converted, starting in 1930, to Class I1sa. This involved an externally-invisible modification to the cylinder steam vents which increased the maximum cut-off from 50% to 78%.
   
J1 2-10-4 65 of these engines were built at Altoona between 1942 and 1944. Engine numbers were 6150-6174 and 6435-6474. Some had fabricated ('bar') frames and others had cast one-piece frames.
J1a 2-10-4 60 of these engines were built at Altoona in 1943. Engine numbers were 6401-6434 and 6475-6500. All had cast one-piece frames.
J28 2-6-2 Two locomotives, #2761 and #7453, were built by Alco in 1905. These had 80" drivers, radial-stay fireboxes, and piston valves. #2761 had Walschaerts valve gear. #7453 had inboard piston valves and Stephenson valve gear. They were experimental engines, similar to theClass H28 and E29. One was still on the roster in 1924, but both were gone by the end of 1929. This made the 'J'Class available for reuse with the 2-10-4 engines in 1942. The J28 engines most certainly did not 'lose out' to the K4s; there was never any competition between these classes. The J28 engines preceded the K28, which was the first 4-6-2, by two years.

Notes on Classes I and J



K2 4-6-2 153 engines built new at Altoona 1910-1911. 151 engines later superheated and reclassified as Class K2s.
K2s 4-6-2 151 engines, all converted from Class K2.
K2a 4-6-2 72 engines built new by Alco and by PRR's Altoona shops 1911-1913. All were later superheated and reclassified as Class K2sa. These engines were identical to Class K2 except for a higher firing deck (77" versus 66"), to accommodate the application of stokers. Only a few engines assigned to Lines West (of Pittsburgh) actually received stokers.
K2sa 4-6-2 72 engines, all converted from Class K2a. Notes for classes K2, K2s, K2a and K2sa: all had 24" x 26" cylinders, 80" drivers, fabricated trailing trucks, Belpaire fireboxes with 55.4 square feet of grate area, piston valves and Walschaerts valve gear.
K2b 4-6-2 2 engines, numbers 3371 and 3375, built new at Altoona in 1911. Similar to Class K2 but had 72" drivers and cast Kiesel trailing trucks. Both were later superheated and reclassified as Class K2sb.
K2sb 4-6-2 2 engines, numbers 3371 and 3375, both converted from Class K2b.
K3s 4-6-2 30 engines built new by Baldwin in 1913. Similar to Class K2a but equipped with 26" x 26" cylinders, superheaters, stokers (Crawford underfeed type, later replaced) and distinctive Lines West-style tenders (Class 80-P-79). Five of these engines were sold, without tenders, to the Norfolk & Western in the early 1930's, becoming theirClass E3 (#500-504, Formerly PRR #8657, 7075, 7090, 7308 and 8658).
K4s 4-6-2 425 engines built new by Baldwin and by PRR's Altoona shops 1914-1928. One engine was built in 1914, #1737. 41 engines were built in 1917 and received scattered numbers. 111 engines were built in 1918 and received numbers 3667-3684, 5334-5349 and other scattered numbers. 15 engines were built in 1919 and received scattered Lines West numbers. 50 engines were built in 1920 and numbered 3726-3775. 57 engines were built in 1923 and numbered 3800-3801, 3805-3807, and 3838-3889. 50 engines were built in 1924 and numbered 5350-5399. 92 engines were built in 1927 and numbered 5400-5491. 8 engines were built in 1928 and numbered 5492-5499. All were built at Altoona except for #5400-5474. Five engines were later rebuilt with 15" piston valves (instead of the standard 12") and reclassified as Class K4sa. Three engines were later rebuilt with different types of poppet valves (#5399 - Franklin oscillating cams, #5436 - Jones steam actuated, and #3847 - Franklin Type B) but all remainedClass K4s.
K4sa 4-6-2 5 engines, all converted from Class K4s. # 612 was one of the five, but I don't know the numbers of the other four.
Notes forClass K4: all were built with 27" x 28" cylinders, 80" drivers, cast Kiesel trailing trucks, Belpaire fireboxes with 69.9 square feet of grate area, piston valves and Walschaerts valve gear.
K5 4-6-2 2 engines, one each built by Altoona (#5698, built with piston valves and Walschaerts valve gear) and Baldwin (#5699, built with Caprotti poppet valves) in 1929. These engines were somewhat experimental, basically an attempt to create a super-K4 by combining a modified I1s boiler with an improved chassis (cast steel frame with integral cylinders). They were slippery and not very successful because weight on drivers was almost the same as for K4s but piston stroke was longer and boiler pressure was increased from 205 psi to 250 psi.
K21s 4-6-2 ex-Vandalia Class VK1s. 12 engines built new by Alco 1910-1913. Vandalia numbers 1-12, changed after 1916 to PRR numbers 8701-8712. Specifications similar to Class K2/K3 but a bit lighter, radial-stay instead of Belpaire fireboxes and a different type of fabricated trailing truck.
K28 4-6-2 1 engine, #7067, built new by Alco-Pittsburgh in 1907. This was the PRR's first 4-6-2 and many elements of the design were incorporated into Class K2. Similar to Class K2 but with a radial-stay firebox and 61.9 square feet of grate area. Later superheated and reclassified as Class K28s.
K28s 4-6-2 1 engine, #7067, converted from Class K28.
K29s 4-6-2 1 engine, #3395, built new by Alco-Schenectady in 1911. Some elements of this design were incorporated into Class K4s. Radial-stay firebox with 66.1 square feet of grate area.

Notes on Class K

  • There were no engines assigned to classes K1, K6 though K20, K22 through K27, or K30 and higher.


L1s 2-8-2 574 engines built new by the PRR's Altoona shops, Baldwin and Lima between 1914 and 1919. Scattered numbers, mostly below 7000. All were built without stokers and power reverse, which were added later. Boiler was the same as for theClass K4s 4-6-2. Equipped with 27" x 30" cylinders and 62" drivers. One (#2861) was rebuilt in 1932 with a water-tube firebox and 10 were converted for oil-firing but they were not reclassified.
L2s 2-8-2 5 engines built new by Alco 1919. Numbers 9627-9631, standard USRA light engines, assigned to the Grand Rapids and Indiana district. ex-GR&IClass GL1s. Easily distinguished from Class L1s by their radial-stay fireboxes and Hodges fabricated trailing trucks.
   
M1 4-8-2 201 engines. One built new by Altoona in 1923 (number 4700, later renumbered 6699), 175 built new by Baldwin in 1926 (numbers 6800-6974), and 25 engines built new by Lima in 1926 (numbers 6975-6999). Equipped with 27" x 30" cylinders and 72" drivers. Boiler derived from Class I1s design but with much larger combustion chamber. Distinguishable from Class M1a by their conventional cylinders (external steam pipes running from the smokebox to the valve chests). Starting in 1938, the original cast-steel cylinder assemblies were replaced with cylinder assemblies fabricated of formed and welded steel plates. This was accomplished at a rate of four engines per month and supposedly saved 5000 lbs of weight and improved reliability.
M1a 4-8-2 100 engines. 50 built new by Baldwin in 1930 (numbers 6700-6749), 25 built new by Altoona shops in 1930 (numbers 6750-6774), and 25 built new by Lima in 1930 (numbers 6775-6799). Similar to Class M1 but equipped with one-piece cast-steel cylinder assemblies with inside steam delivery pipes. Starting in 1946, 38 engines were converted to Class M1b by increasing boiler pressure from 250 psi to 270 psi.
M1b 4-8-2 38 engines, all converted from Class M1a. No externally visible differences.
   
N1s 2-10-2 60 engines. 35 built new by Alco-Brooks 1918-1919 and 25 built new by Baldwin 1919. Scattered numbers above 7000. Equipped with 30" x 32" cylinders, 62" drivers, 215 psi boiler pressure, Belpaire fireboxes, and Kiesel cast-steel trailing trucks.
N2s 2-10-2 130 engines built new by Alco and Baldwin 1919. Standard USRA heavy design, scattered numbers. Some were equipped with Walschaerts valve gear and others had Southern valve gear. Starting in 1923, all 130 engines were converted to Class N2sa by replacing the original radial-stay fireboxes with Belpaire fireboxes. Either way, they could be distinguished from Class N1s by their fabricated trailing trucks and lighter appearance.
N2sa 2-10-2 130 engines, all converted from Class N2s.

There were no steam locomotives assigned to classes O or P. The PRR's Class O included electric locomotives of wheel arrangement 2-B-2 (4-4-4), and theClass P included electric locomotives of wheel arrangement 2-C-2 (4-6-4).


Q1 4-6-4-4 One engine, number 6130, built new at Altoona in 1942. Duplex drive, with both cylinder sets mounted in a common rigid frame. 77" drivers, Walschaerts valve gear.
Q2 4-4-6-4 26 engines built new at Altoona. #6131 built in 1944 and #6175-6199 built in 1945. Duplex drive, 69" drivers, Walschaerts valve gear, most powerful 10-drivered engine ever built.

There were no steam locomotives assigned to Class R. The PRR's Class R included an electric locomotive of wheel arrangement 2-D-2 (4-8-4).


S1 6-4-4-6 One engine, number 6100, built new at Altoona in 1939. Duplex drive, 84" drivers, Walschaerts valve gear.
S2 6-8-6 One engine, number 6200, built new by Baldwin in 1944. Steam turbine, 68" drivers.
   
T1 4-4-4-4 52 engines. Numbers 6110 and 6111 built new by Baldwin in 1942. 25 built new by Altoona in 1946 (numbers 5500-5524) and 25 built new by Baldwin in 1946 (numbers 5525-5549). Duplex drive, 80" drivers. Built with poppet valves and Franklin oscillating cam valve gear. One engine, number 5547, was later rebuilt with Walschaerts valve gear and reclassified as Class T1a. One engine, number 5500, was later rebuilt with Franklin Type B rotary cam valve gear but was not reclassified.
T1a 4-4-4-4 One engine, number 5547, rebuilt from Class T1

There were no locomotives assigned to classes U, V, W, X, Y or Z.


CC1s 0-8-8-0 One engine, number 3397, built new by Baldwin 1912. Compound, 56" drivers, Belpaire firebox, scrapped in 1931.
CC2s 0-8-8-0 10 engines built new by Baldwin 1919. Numbers 7250, 7332, 7335, 7649, 7693, 8158, 8183, 9357, 9358, and 9359. Compound, 51" drivers, radial-stay fireboxes, in service through the late 1940s.
   
HC1s 2-8-8-0 One engine, number 3700, built new by Altoona in 1919. Simple articulated, 30-1/2" x 32" cylinders, 62" drivers, Belpaire firebox, scrapped in 1929.
   
HH1s 2-8-8-2 One engine, number 3396, built new by Alco in 1911. Simple articulated, 27" x 28" cylinders, 56" drivers, radial-stay firebox, scrapped in 1928.
HH1 2-8-8-2 6 engines, numbers 373-378, bought used from the Norfolk & Western in 1943. These were N&W Class Y-3, compounds of USRA design built in 1919.

General Comments

Duplex vs. Mallet

Use of 's' suffix

The PRR decided sometime in 1923 to drop the 's' from its classifications of new steam locomotive designs, because the superheater was by then a standard design element and would always be included in the future. It appears that this policy was implemented sometime after June 1923, when the first of the G5s class 4-6-0 engines was completed, and before October 1923, when the first M1 class 4-8-2 was completed. It is not correct, however, that the 's' was only used for those classes where the locomotives as originally built were not superheated. The following PRR classes were built between 1913 and 1923 and all engines in these classes were originally equipped with superheaters:

K4s 4-6-2 first built 1914
K3s 4-6-2 built 1913
CC1s 0-8-8-0 built 1912
CC2s 0-8-8-0 built 1919
L1s 2-8-2 first built 1914
L2s 2-8-2 built 1919, USRA design
I1s 2-10-0 first built 1916
N1s 2-10-2 built 1919
N2s 2-10-2 built 1919, USRA design
A5s 0-4-0 first built 1916
HC1s 2-8-8-0 built 1919
B28s 0-6-0 built 1919, USRA design
H10s 2-8-0 first built 1913
G5s 4-6-0 first built 1923

The 80 production units of class E6s that were built in 1914 were equipped with superheaters based on the results of testing conducted with the three earlier class E6 prototypes, which were later rebuilt with superheaters and reclassified as E6s.

It is correct that the 's' was added to the classification of locomotives that were rebuilt with superheaters. The superheater provided a large increase in power and efficiency so it was appropriate to differentiate between saturated and superheated engines that were otherwise identical. For many years, in some cases until the end of steam, saturated and superheated variants of the same locomotives both appeared on the PRR's roster. This applied to 4-4-0, 4-4-2, 4-6-2, 2-8-0, and 0-6-0 type engines of various classes. It did not follow that the application of a superheater to one unit of a class meant that every unit of the class received a superheater.

A Brief History of the PRR's Classification Scheme

The PRR's original locomotive classification system was in force between 1867 and 1895. Under this system, each significant locomotive type was assigned a differentClass letter even if the wheel arrangements were the same. To illustrate this, classes A, B and C were all 4-4-0 type locomotives but with differing specifications.

By the early 1890s nearly every letter of the alphabet had been assigned, and locomotives with quite different specifications were being lumped together in a single class. A good example of this is Class P. There were a number of experimental and other odd-lot engines, some acquired with purchased railroads, that were not assigned into classes under the old system. It was clearly necessary to change to a new locomotive classification system.

Under the new system, which was used from 1895 until the end of steam, each wheel arrangement received a letter identifier and significant variations between locomotives of like wheel arrangement were assigned different numeric identifiers. The letter A was assigned to locomotives of the 0-4-0 wheel arrangement, with the oldest major variation of this type being identified as Class A1 and the next as Class A2. A small letter 's' indicated that the class was equipped with superheaters (this was done between about 1905 and 1923, after which superheaters were standard equipment on all new classes). Other variations of a basic class were identified with small letters a, b, c, d, etc. Even under the new system there were a few experimental and odd-lot engines that were not assigned classes.

The 1867 classification system was intended to identify the standard locomotive designs that were then being developed by the PRR's mechanical department. Not all engines that were owned by the railroad received classifications under this system. In 1876 only 68% of the locomotive roster was classified. The remainder didn't match the specifications for the standard classes.

The 'new' (1895) classification system accommodated many more classes than the old system and it was possible to include engines that weren't PRR standard designs (such as engines acquired when the PRR bought other roads, the USRA engines, etc.).

The PRR's electric locomotives were classified using the same letter and wheel arrangement relationships as for the steam locomotives. Thus, loosely applying the Whyte classification system, Class DD1 engines were of wheel arrangement 4-4-0+0-4-4 (the letter D was assigned to the 4-4-0 type and the DD1 locomotive was made up of two 4-4-0 chassis semi-permanently connected back to back).

Conventions regarding identifying the wheel arrangements of American electric locomotives were not well defined or agreed upon during the steam era, however. In general, it is the European system of wheel arrangement identification that is the most widely accepted. In this scheme, unpowered axles are identified with numbers and powered axles are identified with letters, with the '+' symbol used to indicate joints in an articulated chassis. As an example, the PRR's DD1 class would be identified as a 2-B+B-2 type. This is the same scheme that is currently used to identify diesel and modern electric locomotives.

Other Notes

I believe it is more correct to identify the PRR's L5 class as a 1-B-B-1 than as a 2-8-2. The L5 did have eight drivers in a rigid frame, but they were powered by side rods in two sets of four drivers. The PRR's L6 class was a true 2-8-2 or, preferably, 1-D-1.

The PRR did not refer to its O1 class as Jubilees, its P5 class as Hudsons or Baltics, nor its R1 class as Northerns. These names are commonly associated with steam locomotives of the 4-4-4, 4-6-4 and 4-8-4 wheel arrangements, respectively, of other railroads. However, the PRR did not operate any of these and certainly would not use a name (such as Hudson) pioneered by its arch-rival, the New York Central! I believe that it is more appropriate, and more easily understood by railfans, to use the designations 2-B-2, 2-C-2, and 2-D-2 for these classes.


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2000.10.31